Chickens of Literature, Old and New

Our granddaughter Daelynn turns one year old this week.  Books were suggested as a gift, so off to the bookstore I went.  There I found Ed’s Egg, a sweet picture book written by David Bedford and illustrated by Karen Sapp, from London-based QED Publishing.  I was hooked from the first page:  “Ed loved being an egg.”  Little Ed’s reluctance to leave the safety of his egg is endearing (I feel like that every Monday morning–don’t we all?) and it doesn’t hurt that the ginormous mother hen bears more than a passing resemblance to our own Clucky J. Cluckington.  All in all, a quirky but tender story that I hope Dealynn (and her parents) will enjoy.

If you grew up in the 1970’s, or your parents did, you probably remember the book Animals Should Definitely Not Wear Clothing by Judi and Ron Barrett.  Iconic (and sometimes troubling) illustrations in lime green and pink detail many potential mishaps, and may very well have led to my lifelong predilection for visualizing worst-case scenarios.  The text is written with tongue firmly in cheek — for example, “because it might make life hard for a hen” (left), and the authors’ bio page, which states that the Barrett’s “both firmly believe that animals should definitely not wear clothing, except for an occasional dog coat on below freezing days.  This is where they draw the line.”  The Barretts also created Cloudy With a Chance of Meatballs, an all-time favorite read-aloud book in the Doughty household through three daughters, two grandsons, and various neices and nephews.  And someday, when she is a little older, Daelynn.

 

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One Comment on “Chickens of Literature, Old and New”

  1. Run-DMSteve says:

    When Daelynn is older, she might enjoy the autobiography of Henry Cabot Henhouse III, the Hunger Games trilogy (in the chicken version, the trilogy only lasts three paragraphs, and then the chickens get fed), and, of course, chick lit.


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